ChartWatchers Newsletter logo

March 2007

ChartWatchers

KEY SECTORS SHOW RELATIVE WEAKNESS

by Chip Anderson

The sector rotations since 26-Feb reflect a defensive and nervous market. Things started changing on Wall Street with the sharp decline on 27-Feb and the PerfChart below shows sector performance since this decline. The Utility SPDR (XLU), the Industrials SPDR (XLI) and the Consumer Staples SPDR (XLP) are the strongest sectors. Strength in XLP and XLU shows a preference for defensive sectors. The Consumer Discretionary SPDR (XLY) and Finance SPDR (XLF) are the weakest sectors and this is not a good sign. As its name implies the Consumer Discretionary sector represents companies that are Read More 

ChartWatchers

ARE WE BEAR YET?

by Chip Anderson

One of my colleagues has been harassing me (in a friendly way) for not yet having declared myself a bear. The truth is that top picking is a treacherous business, and I have given it up in favor of letting trend models make my declarations for me. For example, I changed from bullish to neutral (medium-term) on stocks on March 6, and some readers have wondered why I didn't go all the way to bearish instead of just neutral. The reason is that my long-term trend model must be bearish at the time the medium-term mechanical model issues a sell signal in order for me to become medium-term Read More 

ChartWatchers

REVIEWING THE "YEN-CARRY TRADE"

by Chip Anderson

The recent focus of the equity markets is upon the "sub-prime" mortgage problem; and upon the "yen-carry trade". We think both are valid concerns; however, the question of the "yen-carry trade" is more important in our mind than the "sub-prime implosion." Perhaps the sub-prime problem is the "catalyst" to start the correction ball rolling, while the "yen-carry" is the horse that does the heavy-pulling, and the heavy-pulling in this regard is a correction that takes stocks back to more traditional oversold levels. That said, looking at the Yen-S&P 500 ratio, we find two clear periods Read More 

ChartWatchers

FINANCIALS HOLD THE KEY TO THE MARKET

by Chip Anderson

It's no secret that one of the main problems pulling the market down over the last month has been the fallout from subprime mortages. It's also no surprise to read that financial stocks (mainly banks and brokers) have been the weakest part of the market over the last couple of weeks. That's a concern because financial stocks are historically viewed as market leaders. They had been leading the market higher over the last two years. Not anymore. The line on top of Chart 1 is a ratio of the Financials Select SPDR (XLF) divided by the S&P 500. That ratio peaked in October of last year Read More 

ChartWatchers

MARKET'S FIRST RECOVERY ATTEMPT FAILS

by Chip Anderson

Hello Fellow Chartwatchers! Last week's recovery rally was crushed by Tuesday's big decline and while the Dow quickly rose back above 12,000, the technical damage was done. The chart below shows the important technical developments for the Dow in recent days. See if you can spot the key signals. For me, the key signals include: The PPO is at its lowest level in months. The CMF remains in negative territory and appears headed lower. The 200-day Read More 

ChartWatchers

ENERGY - A BULLISH VIEW

by Chip Anderson

We have been in the bearish camp on energy and over the past several months and for now remain on the bearish side. But anytime you take a position on the bullish or bearish side, you need to realize patterns that could change your view. The price of oil broke a five year uptrend in 2006 that has us very cautious on the energy sector in 2007. There are circumstances and patterns that could develop to change our bearish view. Oil prices have been bouncing, from lows just under $50 per barrel to our recent highs back over $62 per barrel. Will the sudden uptrend continue or will the rally Read More 

ChartWatchers

CORRECTION AHEAD FOR S&P 500?

by Chip Anderson

The current breakdown in the S&P 500 looks quite similar to the May-June 2006 breakdown. Let's look at the May-June 2006 break down first. The S&P 500 surged from mid October to mid December (2005) and then began a slower zigzag higher until early May (2006). Despite slowing momentum, the trend was in good shape as long as the index kept forging higher highs and higher lows. The break down started with a sharp decline and break below the April low in mid May. There was a brief reaction rally back above 1280 and then another move lower to forge the mid June low. The total decline Read More 

ChartWatchers

UPDATED CRASH ANALYSIS

by Chip Anderson

In light of this week's sharp decline (mini-crash?), the most obvious subject for discussion in this week's article is to question whether or not we are on the verge of another major crash. In my 12/8/2006 article, Crash Talk Is Premature, I stated: ". . . my analysis of the price structure and internal indicators leads me to the conclusion that there is not a crash anywhere in sight. This does not preclude a crash triggered by an external event of which we can have no advance knowledge, but the visible deterioration that typically precedes a crash does not currently exist." "To Read More 

ChartWatchers

RECENT DECLINE MORE THAN JUST A CORRECTION?

by Chip Anderson

Last week's market decline was quite interesting from a number of perspectives. First, the decline clearly mirrors the movement in Japanese Yen as the "carry-trade" is unwound; if one watches these closely, one will see that stock traders are cleary focused on the yen. We will have more to say on this in the future; but suffice to say, a major reversal higher in the yen has taken place. Secondly, and perhaps more importantly from an economic perspective in the US - is that our simple interest rate model of the ratio between the 5-year note and 10-year note ($FVX:$TNX) has broken important Read More 

ChartWatchers

YEN/EURO IS IN MAJOR SUPPORT AREA AND OVERSOLD

by Chip Anderson

Our main concern here is the relationship between the world's strongest currencies and the Japanese yen. Since 2000, the world's strongest currency has been the Euro (followed by the Swiss Franc, Canadian and Aussie Dollars, and the British Pound. The yen has been the weakest global currency). Chart 1 measures the yen against the Euro (XJY:XEU ratio). The yen has been falling against the Euro (and all other currencies) since 2000. The Yen:Euro ratio, however, has reached a major support level at its 1998 lows and is in oversold territory as measured by the monthly stochastic lines. Purely Read More 

ChartWatchers

P&F CHARTS PROVIDE PERSPECTIVE

by Chip Anderson

Hello Fellow Chartwatchers! This week's market gyrations have caused many people to stop and question the market's current position - sometimes quite emotionally. In times like this I like to go back to basics and look at some of the most impartial charts out there - Point and Figure charts. Check out this chart of the S&P 500 index: Again, P&F charts compress long uptrends and downtrends into vertical columns of rising X's and falling O's. (The red numbers & letters in the boxes indicate which box was filled first during the corresponding month.) By compressing Read More